Blog

September 28, 2016
Yahoo 
Finance
 Article 
Names
 CNE 
One 
of 
Top 
10 
Charities 
in 
America
Posted By Woodson Development Team

The Center for Neighborhood Enterprise has been named one of the top 10 charities in the nation in an article entitled “The
Best Charities in America” carried by Yahoo Finance. The ranking is based on CNE’s very low administrative costs (.02%) and its four‐star rating by Charity Navigator. The Center is eighth on  the list.

“Anyone who chooses to use their hard‐earned money to help others—whether its Mark Zuckerberg or your wealthy aunt—wants their donations to be used wisely,” writes Greg Bocquet on Mainstreet. “With that in mind, here we look at the charities with the lowest admin costs, using data taken from Charity  Navigator, a comprehensive charity rating website that evaluates philanthropy groups based on the tax records that they provide detailing yearly expenses.”

Bocquet notes that the groups on the list of 10 top charities in America not only have low administrative costs, but they have received Charity Navigator’s perfect rating of four stars. “Keep in mind that low admin costs do not always mean a good charity, as a group that doesn’t invest enough in administering its programs may be very inefficient at distributing donations to the people who need them most,” he writes. The four star rating provides an overall efficiency assessment based on multiple metrics. Charity Navigator awarded CNE the four star rating earlier this year.

For more information, visit Yahoo.

The Center for Neighborhood Enterprise’s mission is to transform lives, schools, and troubled neighborhoods. Programs include the very successful Violence‐Free Zone youth violence reduction program that is significantly reducing violence in selected middle and high schools in Baltimore, Chicago, Dallas, Milwaukee, and Richmond, VA. Founded in 1981 by Robert L. Woodson, Sr., CNE also provides capacity‐building training and technical assistance to community‐based groups across the country and has provided training to more than 2,600 leaders in low‐income communities.